Label:body energy dominance

Petra Kvitova – Forehand improvement to a higher 3.0 standard

Then over the years, the forehand has brought Petra some winners, but often also rather a quite serious amount of errors as some of the Forehand 3.0 principles have been often missing in her game. It was the reason why I have repeatedly criticized her forehand, (also) here on this site, in the past and why I have mentioned some hints towards possible improvements, also to Petra's surrounding, mainly since the later part of the 2015 season. It might be just a pure coincidence, but especially after...

Reilly Opelka – Rather troubled forehand

Below, I am comparing Reilley's forehands at these two above mentioned events. I am surely aware that the coordination and an exact footwork are challenging at Reilly's size, but what I am focusing at is the way how he approaches the given strokes as this gives me certain information about the mental image of the stroke in his mind. In the case of an optimal "3 Step Tennis Stroke Regulation", the player puts the priority at the creation....

Jack Sock – Strong service and forehand combination

In general, Jack has mastered in both strokes the art of the close to optimal body energy unloading (=Tennis 3.0), which goes over the targeted pronation of the entire limb (long-axis pronation). This targeted pronation is possible when, among other conditions, a perfect eye control of the ball leading to optimal spacing is present. Some of the other conditions necessary...

Petra Kvitova – Two-handed backhand return

In general, being able to hit the return either in the open stance or with the stepping in leads mostly to a much more dominant return with body energy involvement than stepping across, which mostly blocks a significant amount of the body energy. The ability to dominate a high amount of the returns from the outside leg (also on the forehand side) is one of the key elements in the game of the very top players. It brings, besides the already mentioned body energy dominance, also....